Epidemiological and Clinical Aspects of Scorpion Envenomation in Machacalis, Minas Gerais, Brazil, from 2016 to 2017

Autores:
Dilceu Silveira Tolentino Júnior1,*, Eliseu Miranda de Assis2, Roberto Carlos de Oliveira3, Arlanjo Bispo de Sousa Marques4, Bruno Souza Farias5, Jessé Medeiros Leandro6, Lucas Silveira Paulo7, Mácio Emílio Caldeira da Silva8, Lízia Colares Vilela9
Cursos:
1- Institute of Science, Engineering and Technology, Federal University of the Jequitinhonha and Mucuri Valleys, Teófilo Otoni, Minas Gerais 39803-371, Brazil 2- Academic Department, Federal Institute of Bahia, Eunápolis, Bahia 45823-431, Brazil 3- Indigenous Health Observatory, University of Brasília, Federal District, Brasília 70847-510, Brazil 4- Department of Epidemiological Surveillance, Health Secretariah of Bertópolis, Bertópolis, Minas Gerais 39875-000, Brazil 5- Audit Department, Santa Rosália Hospital, Teófilo Otoni, Minas Gerais 39800-022, Brazil 6- Department of Epidemiological Surveillance, Health Secretariah of Fronteira dos Vales, Fronteira dos Vales, Minas Gerais 39870-000, Brazil 7- Department of Epidemiological Surveillance, Health Secretariah of Santa Helena de Minas, Santa Helena de Minas, Minas Gerais 39874-000, Brazil 8- Department of Epidemiological Surveillance, Health Secretariah of Machacalis, Machacalis, Minas Gerais 39873-000, Brazil 9- Medical School of Mucuri, Federal University of the Jequitinhonha and Mucuri Valleys, Teófilo Otoni, Minas Gerais 39803-371, Brazil
Professores:
Eliseu Miranda de Assis2, Roberto Carlos de Oliveira3, Lízia Colares Vilela9
Resumo:

Scorpion envenomation is a serious public health problem in tropical regions due to its high frequency and severity. This research aimed to estimate the prevalence of human cases of scorpion stings reported at Cura D’ars Hospital, Machacalis, Brazil, between 2016 and 2017, in addition to identifying the epidemiological and clinical aspects. This was a descriptive and retrospective study, using the database of the Information System for Notifiable Diseases in Brazil as a reference. Of the five municipalities evaluated, Machacalis had the highest number of cases, although Bertópolis recorded the highest prevalence. A total of 84 cases of scorpion stings were identified, corresponding to 91% of all cases of involvement with poisonous animals. Regarding the sociodemographic profile, the proportion was higher in males (52.0%), people with brown skin (67.0%), people aged 7–14 years (26.0%), and people from rural areas (68.0%). Regarding the epidemiological characteristics, 50.0% of the individuals were assisted between 1 and 3 h after the sting. The main anatomical region affected was the hand (26.0%), and 30.0% used specific serotherapy. For cases classified clinically according to severity, 70.2% were mild, 21.5% moderate, and 8.3% severe. The study allowed us to establish the profile of the victims of scorpion envenomation treated in this area of hospital coverage, as well as to evaluate the approach of the health teams in response to the demand that this neglected condition imposes.

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